The work in the second chapter investigates the added value of the generated fundamental knowledge for designing. The various prototypes of PeP (first chapter) are essentially research prototypes; they do not resemble any consumer product. The artefacts in the second chapter are not, in the first place, research artefacts, but can be used in context. The findings are applied in the field of intelligent textiles. Because textiles naturally shape and define the environment we live and work in, intelligent interior textile is an adequate field of focus for the research in the second chapter. Designing textile artefacts explores how the proposed theoretical framework and the resulting design-relevant knowledge can be applied in our daily environment. The spatial qualities of interior textiles lead towards the implementation of the design notions in a more dynamic and complex setting. This answers the question how an artefact can evolve over time and adapt to multiple persons and events.

PeR

The textile artefacts developed in this chapter are PeR and PeR+ (Perception Rug). These carpets have sensing and actuating characteristics. They are sensitive to the touch of people, and a body of light behaves in the surface of the carpet. Their behaviour directly builds on the behaviour developed in PeP and PeP+. The aesthetics and level of integration of behaviour, electronics and material in these artefacts are high. The first prototype, PeR, is completely hand-knotted, and electronics are integrated also by hand. The second prototype, PeR+, is developed in collaboration with international flooring company DESSO. This collaboration with an industrial partner investigates the feasibility and value for the market of the design-relevant knowledge. Although the theoretical background is not the main driver in this collaboration, it is the starting point for putting forward high-quality and innovative design opportunities. Besides the core research topic of the project, a considerable amount of knowledge is also generated in the field of textile materials and how to combine them with electronics. Moreover, it provided insights on the multidisciplinary innovation process. Both PeR and PeR+, their behaviour and the practical implementations, are extensively described in the second chapter. The chapter concludes with an astute proposition for systems of interactive products. Three concepts, that are a direct result of the work in both the first, current and third chapters support the proposition. All three concepts build on experienceable artefacts. The behaviour of the artefact is sketched in a more spatial and functional context.

Introduction
PeR

Visuals and
Publications

  • Movies
    • moviethumb
      PeR

      PeR

    • moviethumb
      PeR

      PeR+

    • moviethumb
      PeR

      PiA

  • Photos
  • Publications
    • Deckers, E., Stouw, van der, B., Peutz, J., (2012). Development of an Intelligent and Interactive Carpet. Role of design in a textile innovation project. Research Journal on Textile and Apparel 16(4), pp. 14-20.
    • Deckers, E.J.L., Wensveen, S.A.G., Overbeeke, C.J. (2011). PeR: Designing for perceptive qualities. Proceedings Extended Abstracts CHI2011, p. 491. ACM Press.
    • Deckers, E. J. L., Wensveen, S. A. G., & Overbeeke, C. J. (2010). PeR: Designing for perceptive qualities. Proceedings DeSForM 2010 (pp. 68-70). Lucerne, Switzerland: Lucerne School of Art and Design.
  • Exhibitions
    • PeR+ at Moving Materials, Capital D, Dutch Design Week 2012 In 2013 Moving Materials will visit Kortrijk and Lancaster, PeR+ included.
    • PeR at DHUB Barcelona, Systems Design: The Eindhoven School, February 2012 to May 2012
    • PeR at Textileweekend Ronse, Opening CampusTIO3 Ronse - Smartroom, December 2011 - January 2012
    • PeR at ID'09, Eindhoven University of Technology, Dutch Design Week 2009
    • PeR at Design United, Delft University of Technology - World Usability Days, November 2009